Cosa vedere a Milano: Piazza Gae Aulenti

What to do in Milan low-cost: free attractions in Milan

Sometimes I tell you something about what to do in Milan. Because I like Milan: it’s the city that saw me grow up and I think that Milan is beautiful this city, despite the traffic and the chaos that makes you crazy if you take the subway on Monday morning (but also on Tuesdays or Wednesdays… 😉 )

Because Milan is beautiful, from its white “Duomo“, so impressive and amazing! Milan is beautiful on Saturday morning, when the city is sleeping and it’s a pleasure walk from Cadorna Square to San Babila Square. Milan is beautiful if you see the city from one of his old tram and you are just sitting on that wooden seat thinking about being in a movie in black and white.

But where to start if you do not know what to see in Milan and you have little time? This question I have made some time ago, because in fact Milan is a “big city” and if you do not know you do not know where to begin. The Cathedral of course, the Vittorio Emanuele Gallery and the Sforzesco Castle with a stroll through the shops. But also the Church of Saint Ambrogio and Brera Academy or the Navigli, the Columns of San Lorenzo and the Fashion District. If you are looking for tips about what do do in Milan or what to see you can find some itineraries following these links.

But Milan is an expensive city and if you are looking for a way to visit Milan with a low-cost budget here you can find some Milan attractions for free. Because today I try to give you with five ideas on what to do in Milan low-cost off the usual track and enjoy this city also with a real low budget.

[cml_media_alt id='5361']Salire sul Duomo di Milano - Il nuovo Skyline della città con le torri Unicredit[/cml_media_alt]
What to do in Milan: Skyline of the “new Milan”

What to do in Milan without pay: Milan attractions for free!

What to see in Milan for free: Visit the Monumental Cemetery in Milan

If you love arts the Monumental Cemetery in Milan will be a beautiful stop and this is one of the things to do in Milan for free. Because the Monumental Cemetery in Milan is an open-air museum, a treasure chest and a place to get lost if you love the photographs. Bombed during the Second World War because of its proximity to the railway cemetery has managed to stay (mostly) intact, preserving his works of art. Stroll through its avenues, look around and do not worry, there is nothing to be afraid of getting lost if you do not …! So remember to take a map at the entrance where you will explain the works not to be missed! 😉

Milan attractions for free: Visit the Braidense Public Library

The Braidense Public Library ( named “Biblioteca Braidense“) is one of the most ancient library of Milan and it is a perfect stop for a rainy day. But this library is also a wonderful place if you like books and you want getting lost among ancient volumes! The Braidense Library is really a place of the past but continues to live in the present and this is one of the things to do in Milan for free. If you love the modernity go to the nearby Santa Teresa Mediatheque. Believe me there too much room for dreams and dreamers!

[cml_media_alt id='4988']Cosa vedere a Milano: Street Art nel Quartiere Isola[/cml_media_alt]
Milan Attractions for free: Isola District

What to do in Milan low-cost: a Street Art Tour in Isola District

Milan is a city full of museum but the art is also outside the museums and for free. Do not believe us? Well, look around, look at the walls and shuttered shops, you might meet Arnold and weird “microbes”, penguins and funny Mister Magoo crossing light the city. If you like Stree Art go to the Milan District named Isola District and simply enjoy a free Street Art Tour. AAnd don’t miss the underpass of Milano Porta Garibaldi railway station that was painted – so fantastic- by school students!

What to do in Milan for free: churches and miracles

The church named “Chiesa di Santa Maria della Fontana” is a sixteenth-century church hidden among the buildings as often happens in Italy. The peculiarity of this church is – as the name implies – its fountain flowing, according to the faithful, blessed water so miraculous that here before there was even a large pool where the sick were diving to treat their pain .

The church of Santa Maria of the fountain dates back to the time when the Benedictines possessed this whole area and was built in 107 thanks to Charles Dambois who received the miracle, he promised the building. But his story has continued well beyond and there is even talk of intervention by Leonardo da Vinci that – apparently – was responsible for the part of hydraulic engineering. Even today you can meet pilgrims who come to drink the holy water and stop to admire the wonderful frescoed vault of the cloister that – even if you do not believe in miracles – you should not miss.

[cml_media_alt id='5364']Salire sul Duomo di Milano - Vista su Piazza Duomo[/cml_media_alt]
What to do in Milan: Duomo

What to do in Milan: the vertical Bosco, Palazzo Unicredit and the Palazzo Lombardia

Among the things to see in Milan don’t miss the area named “New Milan” that is quite different form the rest of the city. Here you can find some beautifum skyscaper as the Bosco Verticale (literally “the vertical forest”), the Unicredit Palace and the Lombardy Palace. The Bosco Verticale – the skyscraper designed by Studio Boeri and built where before growing a forest called “Bosco di Gioia” make green the skyline of Milan, with its 4,000 acres of shrubs and plants. To choose the trees that had to be planted on the balconies of this skyscraper seems experiments have been made even in the wind tunnel and each plant was also selected based on its flowering: on the north side there are hazel and beech trees while on the east with a flowering spring.
Not far there is the Palazzo Lombardia and Unicredit Tower with the Gae Aulenti Square. Beyond the debate on some is the tallest skyscraper – depending on whether you consider the roof or antenna – stop in the square under the Unicredit and look around. Here everything is designed to create a space that can be a “urban place”: big lamps capture sunlight and give it during the night and the spaces are connected together as to the pipes of chromed brass positioned by the architect Cesare Pelli in plain view at the entrance of the square. This masterpiece is dedicated to “those who want to listen to the sounds and noises of the city “as it is written on the work.

[cml_media_alt id='3184']Cosa vedere a Milano: Il Cimitero Monumentale di Milano[/cml_media_alt]
What to do in Milan: Cemetery
So far my suggestions on what to do in Milan with a low budget but if you fancy a more classic tour with your children try to read this post with some idea to visit Milan with the kids! And if you go to Milan … do me a whistle! 😉



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8 comments

  1. Francesca è un cicerone perfetto per indirizzarvi nella Milano di oggi e di ieri: le sue dritte sono originali e preziose… io lo so, per averle in più di una occasione personalmente utilizzate!

    1. Che gentile! Grazie Carlo! La prossima volta che torni vediamo di trovare nuove mete da scoprire! 🙂

  2. ciao, visto che sei di zona, avresti per caso un consiglio per un hotel o b&b comodo per visitare l’Expo? grazie

    1. Ciao Chiara
      Essendo io in zona non sono ma in stata in hotel ma ti posso indicare il B&B di un’amica che dista circa 20 minuti in auto dall’Expo. Se ti serve trovi il link qui:http://italianstylebnb.com/
      Poi mi racconti come è andata! 🙂

  3. Molto interessante, abito vicinissimo a Milano ma alcune chicche mi erano sfuggite
    Ciao
    Norma

    1. Ciao Norma! Grazie per essere passata di qui! Sai che io ho una piccola lista di cose che vorrei vedere a Milano e non ho mai il tempo di fare??! 🙂
      Un abbraccio e a presto!
      Francesca

  4. Abito vicino a Milano ma sono convinta di non conoscerla ancora bene! Come fai vedere tu ci sono un sacco di chicce meno conosciute!

    1. A chi lo dici!! Ci sono ancora moltissimi luoghi di Milano di cui ho spesso sentito parlare ma che non sono mai riuscita a vedere!!

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